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Despised Washington Commanders Owner Dan Snyder Willing to Sell the Franchise 

Washington Commander Owners Dan and Tanya Snyder speak at an event in February. Photo by Jonothan Newton of the Washington Post. 

Dan Snyder, the owner of the Washington Commanders, has hired Bank of America securities to pursue a potential sale of the historic franchise.

This decision comes in lieu of an abundance of allegations and investigations against Snyder and the Washington Commanders throughout the past two years. There has been consistent pressure on him to sell the team.

“Dan and Tanya Snyder and the Washington Commanders announced today that they have hired BofA Securities to consider potential transactions,” the Commanders said in a statement. “The Snyders remain committed to the team, all of its employees, and its countless fans to putting the best product on the field and continuing the work to set the gold standard for workplaces in the NFL.”

Their workplace standard has fallen flat by setting a “gold standard for workplaces.” However, many believe a cold and cruel aroma infiltrates the atmosphere at FedEx Field in Landover, Virginia. 

In 2020, multiple women accused Commanders employees of sexual misconduct. That year concluded with more allegations of inappropriate conduct in the workplace. Snyder was fined $10 million. The NFL later failed to release the full investigation report, which was led by lawyer Beth Wilkinson, providing only a summary. 

Consequently, the House Committee on Oversight and Reform opened a new investigation into the alleged sexual harassment in the Commanders’ workplace. It wasn’t long before accusations came against Snyder. The investigations into Snyder and the Commanders persist as The U.S attorney’s office in Virginia began a criminal investigation that will evaluate the potential financial deception the Commanders instituted. Financial dishonesty accurately reflects the Snyder-led work culture. 

Snyder has apologized and denied all wrongdoing, however, the allegations have choked the sincerity out of any denial or sorrow Snyder verbalized and will verbalize. Despite changing the team’s name and hiring Jason Wright, the first Black team president in the NFL, fans and DMV natives remain grounded in their convictions about Dan Snyder and the future ownership of the Washington Commanders.

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Howard University football player and DMV native Bryce Parker believes Dan Snyder should acquiesce to the pressure and sell the Washington Commanders. 

“It is past time for a change in ownership for this football team,” Parker said. “I am excited for the possibility of this team being under new leadership.” Parker, a junior journalism major, speaks on behalf of the DMV faithful bearing the burden that Dan Snyder has been on their sports culture. 

Robert Griffin III, former Redskins (now the Commanders) quarterback, forthwith revealed the Commanders’ fans’ response if the team were to be sold. The fans “will throw a parade if they sell the team,” Griffin said in a tweet upon notification of Snyder’s decision. If Griffin, a former Heisman trophy winner’s, prophetic words are fulfilled, it will be the first parade held by the Commanders since 1992, the year they last hoisted the Vince Lombardi Super Bowl Trophy. 

Snyder’s reputation and his team’s record have a common ground, losing. As Snyder loses his credibility among colleagues, peers, and fans, the Commanders haven’t garnered a winning record since 2016. They have made the playoffs six times under his ownership. There is little room for commiseration from fans as the Commanders dwell in a historically atrocious division. 

The message from Colts owner Jim Irsay resembles the disdain towards Dan Snyder that fans possess. He believes that no one, including the owner of the sixth most valuable franchise in the NFL, should be vindicated if guilty. “I just believe in the workplace today, the standard that the shield stands for in the NFL, that you have to stand for that and protect that.” Twenty-four of the 32 NFL owners would need to vote in agreement to remove the Commander’s owner. Snyder is determined to drag the white empire of NFL owners down with him assuming he falls from grace.

Snyder purchased the remaining 40.5 percent minority stake for $875 million in March 2021. With the resignation of the Redskins appellation, the franchise’s worth increased. According to Forbes, The Commanders’ value of $5.6 billion, makes them the sixth highest-valued team in the NFL. The team acquired 200 acres of land in Virginia this year, with talks of a new stadium circulating. 

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The path for the Commanders to continually boom has been paved and is compelling, hence, the plethora of individuals being discussed as potential suitors. The front-runners are an investment group headlined by billionaire and Amazon founder, Jeff Bezos and hip-hop mogul, Jay-Z. Brooklyn Nets star Kevin Durant and actor Matthew McConaughey have expressed interest in immersing themselves in Jay- Z and Bezos’ plans, potentially becoming minority owners. 

Snyder can elect to sell the team in entirety or minority. If he fails to acquiesce and does not sell the Commanders, fans will continue to starve for new ownership. 

Snyder and the Washington Commanders, along with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and the National Football League have been sued by D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine. 

Copy edited by Alana Matthew

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